Spirits of Carbide Willson Ruins

The Carbide Willson Ruins are a set of ruins located in Chelsea, Québec (about 20 minutes outside of Gatineau). These ruins are located in a forest that is now part of the Gatineau Park. What you see in the photo above is a glimpse of what remains of Thomas “Carbide” Leopold Willson’s laboratory and makeshift summer home.

In 1892, Mr Willson created the process by which we create calcium carbide, which is essential in steelmaking, amongst other things. Not satisfied with that invention, he purchased 460 acres of land in 1907 to give him space to conduct more experiments and invent new things. He built three structures deep in the woods as a result of his paranoia; he was convinced people were out to steal his inventions. Whether his worries were legitimate or not, he built this structure along with two others nearby to aid in his invention process. The three buildings were originally used for as an acid condensation tower, a dam, and a generating station. However, the tower was destroyed in a fire and was never repaired.

Unsurprisingly, this is quite expensive, and, after some time, Willson went bankrupt and the estate fell into disrepair. He died in 1915 in New York City as a result of a heart attack.

While the ruins are hauntingly beautiful, there is a sense of uneasiness in the air. The ruins are surrounded by waterfalls and streams, and for those who don’t know, attract spirits. Water conducts energy which spirits need to feed on to manifest themselves. This energy can be from running water, like at the ruins, electrical equipment, or even negative feelings and emotions if a haunting takes place at a residence.

Now, this doesn’t necessarily mean that this energy attracts bad spirits, but it does attract them nonetheless.

The surrounding woods are beautiful, yet eerie as well. So quiet you could probably hear a pin drop, and deathly still. Does this mean anything? Maybe not, but no one can deny the feeling they get as soon as they step into these woods. Mixed with the energy conducted by all the running water and the residual energy of a paranoid man, it’s the perfect recipe for a spectre.

What do you think? Do you think the ruins are haunted? Let me know in the comments down below.

Spooky Recommendation: Chambly Cemetery

October really is the best time of year. All the leaves have changed, the air is crisp and, on some days, there’s that creepy October feeling. On days like that, I highly recommend going for a walk in an eerie location. It’s honestly one of my favorite things to do this time of year.

For one of these walks, I went to Stephen’s Anglican Church and Cemetery in Chambly. Located near the Richelieu River, this church was established in 1820 to serve the Loyalist and English settlers in Chambly. Now, the church itself isn’t creepy. It’s well maintained, and from my understanding, it’s still an active church.

However, the cemetery located behind is the definition of creepy cemetery. Among the trees, there are rows and rows of gravestones, many of them dating back to the 19th century. I suspect many of them were soldiers.

There’s even a bridge located on the east side of the church among the trees, that crosses a small stream which opens up to even more graves. It sort of reminded me of that one scene in Pet Semetary…you know? (if you know, you know).

Seriously, I can’t even imagine the activity this place must get at night. Calling all ghost hunters, have I got the place for you. I haven’t been able to find anything about people investigating this location, so unfortunately, I haven’t read any allegations of this place being haunted, but I’m sure one investigation would straighten that out.

So, tell me. Are you brave enough to come here at night and conduct an investigation? Let me know in the comments down below.

Ghosts of Fort Chambly

Fort Chambly (formerly known as Fort St. Louis) is located on the Richelieu River and was built by the French in 1665. This historic landmark has seen many battles, including The Iroquois Wars, The Seven Years’ War, and The American Revolution. All of these battles and wars have left this site with many casualties which has surely left some restless souls behind. There are thousands of unnamed casualties that have marked this place, and as a result have left it with a heavy, uneasy feeling, especially at night. This post is going to be slightly more personal because I actually have a connection with this location!

Commemorative plaque to the fallen soldiers

I lived in Chambly throughout my teenage years, from 2010 to 2015. As a teen it was a fun place to go hang out with my friends and cause a bit of mischief (nothing too serious), however, there was always an uneasy feeling there at night. Right next to the fort, pictured below, there is a clearing with some trees, and I remember always feeling like someone was watching me through the trees. When I mentioned this to my friends at the time, they told me they felt the same way. At the time, I brushed this off as my friends and I feeling paranoid because we were out late when we weren’t necessarily supposed to be.

This was until I visited about a month ago. I took my pictures during the day to get nice, clear shots but I returned when the sun went down to see how it felt. The air was heavy and hit me like a ton of bricks, and that familiar feeling crept over me. It filled me with a sense of dread that only a few locations have been able to do, and I got out of there as fast as I could.

All this to say, I don’t think there’s one spirit in particular that haunts this location. I think it is a result of all the young men who died on these grounds, surely before their time, and their energy remains. It’s not angry energy, but very sorrowful energy that hits you right in the chest.  I suggest checking out the location for yourself once it’s dark and quiet to see what I mean.

Do you have any historical hauntings in your town? Let me know in the comments down below.

Haunted Château Ramezay

Château Ramezay is a historical landmark located in Montréal and was built in 1705 for Claude de Ramezay, the Governor at the time. In 1895 it was established as the headquarters and museum of the Antiquarian and Numismatic Society of Montréal. For a small fee, visitors can enjoy a historical landmark right in their own city. However, they may get a little more than they bargained for.

According to an article published by The Gazette in 2014, a local man who has worked at the Château for 16 years (at the time the article was published) keeps a list of paranormal occurrences that have happened over the years. These occurrences include everything from footsteps, strange noises, and items moving on their own. He’s not the only employee who has witnessed these things; other staff members have reported similar incidents.

Plaque outside the Château itself

So, this leaves us with one question? Just who is this paranormal prankster?

Thankfully, there are two suspects. The first suspect being Anna O’Dowd, the caretaker up until her death in 1985. Rumour has it that she died in the bathtub, however, I tried finding more information on this woman, but unfortunately, I could not find any further information. Our second culprit is possibly a guard who goes by O’Leary. Upon doing some research the only O’Leary I could find associated with Château Ramezay is Thomas O’Leary, who wrote the Catalogue of the Château de Ramezay in 1903.

With a building being over 300 years old, it is no surprise to me that some spirits may linger here. You can feel the history as soon as you step foot on these grounds and its sort of a heavy feeling. The same feeling I got when I visited The Plains of Abraham. It’s unexplainable and one has to visit the Château to feel it for themselves.

Do you work in an old creepy building in your city? Have you had any paranormal experiences? Let me know in the comments down below.